60 Seconds with Summit Pump

Last month we reviewed basic vacuum principles. The reason was to better understand how to correctly measure the differential pressure across an operating pump. Understanding your suction pressure and knowing how to read a vacuum is critical in identifying performance issues. In the field, instruments measure in units of PSI …whether gauge, absolute or vacuum. When diagnosing issues,

  We get calls from the field concerning issues with pumps that are experiencing performance issues. Typically we perform a triage scenario; we first figure out if the pump is on a suction lift arrangement and make sure the pump is notattempting to defy the laws of physics. Once that question is satisfied we then walk through the

Thanksgiving…At this time of year in America we purposefully pause and offer thanks for all we have. Suppose for a minute that in a fictional and make-believe universe you were a pump; what would you give thanks for? We share some ideas.  This Pump is Grateful For…    A balanced impeller, precise shaft alignment, robust foundation and solidly grouted

This issue compliments an earlier issue (Volume 1 issue 12 from April 2018) on the same subject.  I am frequently asked; should the discharge valve be open or closed when the pump is started? My answer is….it depends, but regardless the suction valve better be open. First Things First Let me state that as visitors to client facilities we

Rolling Stone’s front man Mick Jagger’s second favorite song verse is “start me up”…”I’ve been running hot”.   Did you also know there are restrictive limits regarding the number of times an induction motor can be started in a given time period? The restrictions are due to (“running hot”) temperatures and for that singular reason it